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Archive for the ‘Recipes’ Category

 

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I pass Gaby and Pierette’s farm on my daily walk and scurrying out of my path two days ago were a platoon of ducks and geese.

December the first today. They must be new arrivals in time for Christmas.

Les pauvres!

December the first….

DAY ONE, in the early 1950’s, on the advent calendar and the agonisingly slow build-up to the big day.

Sweet torture!

The decorations are up in our little village of Lautrec and outside Monoprix in the town of Castres, the little carrousel and its prancing horses is doing its rounds.

What to buy so-and-so and and mustn’t forget thing-a-ma-jig….

Christmas is now inevitable and the pressure is on.

Well, I have a suggestion….

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I know what it says on the cover but the recipes a healthy and delicious–good for everyone–and Meredith’s photos are sensational.

If your local bookstore doesn’t have it (in the UK), it’s available on Amazon–and only Amazon or other online book dealers in the USA. It’s also available for Kindle.

Here’s a look behind the scenes!

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This is not really about the fishcakes–they’ve featured before and in fact are one of the most popular recipes on my blog.

It’s about how a single item found in the market/shop/fridge can lead to lunch.

Yesterday at the organic market in Castres a producer with whom I regularly shop had a little bunch of dill hiding modestly behind the parsley.

I picked it out and it was perky with that fresh, inimitable scent.

She told me it had grown back unexpectedly. Dill, like coriander, is tricky to grow.

Dill is delicious with thinly sliced cucumber and red onion in a simple salad–but this bunch shouts FISHCAKES in my ear.

Thus, it’s fishcakes in a little tomato coulis for lunch today.

The recipe appears in my first cookbook–Delicious Dishes for Diabetics and in the new cookbook, Mediterranean Cooking for Diabetics.  A variation using smoked haddock appears in my second cookbook, Healthy Eating for Life, also delicious.

They are served with a yogurt sauce in the books.

The key point is there is no potato filler–so it’s low carb.

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If you keep them small and cook them quickly, they’ll be crisp and brown on the outside and still succulent inside–so

It’s vital to make the pan hot.

Salmon Fishcakes with dill and grainy mustard

  • 400 g/1 lb salmon fillet – skinless and checked for bones
  • white of an egg
  • 1 tbsp chickpea flour – of course, plain flour works as well, but chickpea flour (also called gram) is non-gluten, high fiber and higher protein value
  • 1 tsp grain mustard
  • juice of ½ lemon
  • bunch of dill – chopped fine
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 tbsp olive oil

 

Cut up the salmon fillets in roughly equal-size pieces.

Put these in a mixer and pulse three or four times.

Avoid working them too much!  You don’t want slush at the end.

You could just cut them by hand if this suits better.

Place the the salmon in a bowl and add the egg white and the flour, then the mustard, lemon juice and the dill.

Season with salt and pepper.

It’s a good idea to taste the mix for seasoning at this point–the dill and the salt should come through.

Using a dessertspoon, scoop out a dollop.

Arrange these on a plate and refrigerate, if not using immediately.

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When you are ready to eat, heat the oil in a frying pan to HOT.

Cook on a medium-high flame, crisping and browning the outside while making sure the interior cooks through.

Depending on the thickness this takes about a minute each side.

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I found more dill in today’s market–any suggestions?

Encore FISHCAKES!” you’ll cry, after sampling these.

(The tomato coulis tasted good but I think the yogurt sauce is a better partner to these delicious cakes.)

Yogurt sauce

  • 2 x 125 ml pots plain yogurt*
  • 1 tsp grain mustard
  • good pinch of chopped dill (from the main bunch)
  • salt to taste

Whisk the yogurt to a smooth texture and fold in the dill and mustard.

Add salt to taste.

Refrigerate until you are ready to eat

* If you prefer a thicker yogurt sauce, drain it in a sieve for 10 minutes or so.

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The other evening at dinner after a viewing of Ken Loach’s new film, I Daniel Blake (a savage take on the cruelties of the benefits system in the UK–highly recommended), our friend, Melissa Fairbanks, said kind things about my blog.

She particularly enjoys the posts about cooking from found items rolling around in the crisper, she says–bits of cauliflower for instance.

 

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Here is one such that includes bits of cauliflower and other tidbits!

You won’t necessarily have bits of cauliflower, broccoli and sweet potato hanging about in your fridge–but you may have other bits that it hadn’t occurred to you could be transformed into a delicious frittata for a tasty lunch.

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SO….

In my case:

  • 6 eggs–beaten
  • Cooked cauliflower, broccoli and roasted sweet potato–cut into small bits
  • 20z parmesan cheese–freshly grated
  • salt and pepper

Fold the vegetables and cheese into the eggs.

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Season with salt and pepper.

Heat a 10inch fry pan to hot– and pour in the frittata mix. (Choose a pan with the kind of handle that can go into the oven.)

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Immediately turn the heat down to the lowest you can.

Cook for about 25 minutes–until firm with a little “looseness” left on top.

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Heat the grill and slide the pan under for barely a minute to cook the top and brown a little.

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We finished off left-over halves of stuffed red peppers with the slices of the frittata.

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Must check the fridge for other goodies left over!

 

“The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for 30 years she served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been found.”

Calvin Trillin

 

 

 

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Years ago we had lunch at a traditional brasserie in Toulouse and I chose as a starter a salad that sounded a little different.

It was an assembly of baby gem lettuce (called sucrine here– and they have a sweetness to them) small dollops of tapinade, parmesan shavings and quail eggs.

It looked beautiful: green and black with the yellow of the egg yolks and parmesan lifting it into the sublime.

It tasted good too–and joined my repertoire of Starters.

This version takes that recipe further, adding the smoky edge that a little light grilling gives the lettuce halves.

Grilling lettuce? Sounds odd but these tightly formed little gems keep their shape and and are transformed into the main players on the plate.

It helps to have some tapinade* already made, although a scattering of juicy black olives-chopped would do too.

I use the anchovy vinaigrette–also from my cook book–which goes well with these punchy little lettuces–but you could keep it simple and stick with the vinaigrette of your choice.

For 2

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  • 3 baby lettuce hearts–halved lengthwise
  • anchovy dressing* or vinaigrette of choice
  • some tapinade dip (or chopped black oils)
  • parmesan shavings
  • 4 poached eggs
  • a couple of anchovies–halved lengthwise and across (optional!)

Heat a grill pad (the kind that sits on the stove) to hot.

Brush the cut side of the lettuce halves with the dressing and a little more olive oil

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Grill for two or three minutes while lightly brushing the other sides of the lettuces with the dressing.

The grilling should take long enough to soften and color the lettuce without burning.

Turn them over and grill for a further two minutes or so….

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Plate them up and pour over a little more dressing.

Top with dollops of tapinade and some parmesan shavings.

Finish with thinly slice anchovy fillets (if you’re using them).

Add the eggs to the assembly.

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We ate these under the parasol in the courtyard.

Sublime…

 

* recipe in my new book, Mediterranean Cooking for Diabetics and on this blog; it is a handy dip in summer!

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The lovely green spears were in Realmont market today at reasonable prices.

I bought a kilo of straight ones for Friday dinner with our guests, arriving from the USA.

A second of less than perfect (less expensive too) specimens–asperges tordues (twisted)–to make this very simple frittata for lunch.

I have five eggs left in the pantry and a red onion. Add some cheese and seasoning–and there you have the ingredients!

Something different to do with this vegetable with a relatively short-lived season and a use for the cheaper spears with the less than perfect appearance.

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  • 450gms/80z asparagus spears–prepared weight–ie tough ends removed and sliced on the diagonal into smallish pieces
  • 1 red onion–peeled and halved and sliced
  • 3 tbs olive oil
  • 5 eggs–beaten

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  • 2oz grated parmesan cheese
  • salt and pepper

Serves 2 to 4 people 

Soften the onion in the olive oil until it begins to caramelize a little–10 to 15 minutes

Add the asparagus pieces and mix in adding some salt and a twist or two of pepper.

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Cook the mix over a gentle heat until the asparagus begins to soften. I like them to retain a little bite–about 10 minutes.

Let this cool.

Then ease into the beaten egg mix.

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Fold in the cheese and check the seasoning.

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Heat a tablespoon of oil in a 10 inch pan to hot–and fold in the egg mix and spread it evenly.

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Immediately turn the heat down to the lowest and cook for 30 minutes.

There should be just a small pool of liquid left on top.

Finish it under a grill for 30 seconds.

 

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Be careful taking the pan out of the oven–it is very hot, as I was reminded when the pan touched the side of my hand by accident–ouch!

Loosen the frittata round the edges of the pan with a fish slice or spatula and ease it out onto a favorite platter.

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“High on the DING scale!” said Meredith.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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We returned last night from London.

Out of the car and into the kitchen to turn on the oven–180 C.

Lightly wash and brush the dust off a sweet potato.

Prick with a fork to avoid it bursting.

Then pop the potato into the pre-heated oven. It’ll take about an hour, depending on its size.

Sit down and have a cup of tea!

When revived a little make the simple Red bean chili, below from my new book Mediterranean Cooking for Diabetics.

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Adapted from Rose Elliott’s The Bean Book this is a simple solution for people who don’t eat meat but like the look of chili–leave out the carne!

(Not just for vegetarians either–just as my cook book is not just for diabetics!) 

This recipe is my kind of fast food. Quickly done– tastes even better the next day (except we had no leftovers!).

Don’t forget the lemon!

For two weary home comers:

About 8 oz (a jar or tin [can]) of red beans–rinsed and drained

onion–chopped

1 clove of garlic–chopped

2 tbsp olive oil

8oz of tinned [canned] tomatoes–chopped, with the juice

1/2 tsp chili/cayenne powder (more if you like it really spicy)

juice of half a lemon–or more to taste

salt and pepper

  • Soften the onions and garlic gently in the oil–stirring often for about five minutes.
  • Add the chilli powder and the chopped tomatoes with their juice.
  • Mix together, blending in the tomatoes.
  • Add the beans.
  • Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  • Bring gently to the simmer and cook, covered, for about 15 minutes.
  • Pour over the lemon juice and mix thoroughly.

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Halve the sweet potato (orange!)on the plate.

Spoon over the beans (red!).

It needed some greenbut couldn’t be bothered to make the Interesting Cabbage from Mediterranean Cooking for Diabetics

Found three crisp little gem lettuces in the fridge–halved and quartered just one and shared it between the two plates.

Drizzled olive oil and balsamic on each quarter with a pinch of salt.

Orange, red and green–on the plate.

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Different colors, but back in the land of the Tricolour!

 

 

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